Recent #MeToo-inspired media attention to workplace sexual harassment claims has caused a number of states to pass employee-friendly legislation intended to help prevent such conduct. On March 18, 2019, New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy joined the trend, signing into law a bill that, among other things, targets the use of so-called non-disclosure provisions in employment

As 2018 draws to a close, it is worth taking a closer look at the increasing legal impact of the #MeToo movement. The chorus of victims’ voices and the media spotlight exposed the prevalence of sexual misconduct in the workplace.  As a result, state legislatures passed reform measures to create new laws—from New York’s mandate

The State of New York recently issued draft guidance for employers regarding the anti-sexual harassment legislation passed earlier this year. As we previously reported, effective October 9, 2018, all New York employers must either adopt or create a policy that equals or exceeds the State’s model policy and training program. On August 23, 2018,

As we previously reported, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio signed the “Stop Sexual Harassment in NYC Act” (the “Act”) into law earlier this year.  The New York City Commission on Human Rights (the “NYCCHR”) has now released additional guidance, including the mandatory fact sheet and notice referenced in the Act.

Effective September

Maryland recently enacted the Disclosing Sexual Harassment in the Workplace Act of 2018 (the “Act”) with an effective date of October 1, 2018. The Act places two types of obligations on Maryland employers. First, Maryland employers with at least 50 employees will be required to submit survey responses to the Maryland Commission on Civil Rights

Employers and employees entering into separation or settlement agreements have traditionally agreed to nondisclosure clauses that prohibit disclosure of the agreement or the circumstances leading to its execution. Although these clauses have not previously been subject to much controversy and considered to provide valuable closure for employer and employee, the #MeToo movement has generated much

Hogan Lovells invites you to a panel discussion focused on best practices for addressing workplace sexual harassment allegations.

Most companies have anti-harassment policies, but do employees and managers know what these policies really mean? Are these policies enforced consistently across the organization? What are the employer’s obligations when the allegation involves a high-ranking manager or