Virginia has substantially rewritten its employment laws to provide a number of new protections and rights to employees in the areas of employment discrimination, whistleblower protection, non-compete agreements, independent contractor classification, wage payment, and more. Most of these laws take effect on July 1, 2020, and employers must take action to prepare for them, including updating employment policies and practices, providing certain notices to employees, ensuring non-compete agreements are not being provided to employees earning less than the average wage in Virginia, updating pay stubs, and generally understanding new exposures and risks.
Continue Reading Major changes coming to Virginia employment laws on July 1, 2020; prepare now with this employer checklist

The Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) has published a new self-identification form federal contractors (including subcontractors) must provide to individuals to request information concerning their disability status. OFCCP hopes the changes will increase applicant and employee response rates. Notably, the new form deletes the second page of the current form, which reminds applicants and employees of their right to ask the employer for reasonable accommodations to apply for a job or perform a job. Federal contractors must begin using this form on or before August 4, 2020.
Continue Reading Federal contractors must update their voluntary self-identification of disability forms

New York employers – New York State has gifted you an early holiday present – a requirement to update your handbook, comply with a new law immediately or potentially face steep consequences.

On November 8, 2019, Governor Cuomo signed into law a bill prohibiting employment discrimination based on an employee’s or a dependent’s “reproductive health

Many employers offer paid parental leave policies to employees, affording new parents paid time off to care for a new child. Though some employers offer paid parental leave to both new mothers and fathers of equal length, many others offer substantially longer leaves to primary caregivers. Bifurcated parental leave policies for primary and non-primary caregivers

Following months of speculation, the Supreme Court announced today that it would decide whether the prohibition in Title VII against discrimination “because of sex” encompasses discrimination against gay and transgender workers.

The Supreme Court agreed to hear two cases, one from the Second Circuit and another from the Eleventh Circuit, that reached opposing conclusions on

Recent #MeToo-inspired media attention to workplace sexual harassment claims has caused a number of states to pass employee-friendly legislation intended to help prevent such conduct. On March 18, 2019, New Jersey Governor Phil Murphy joined the trend, signing into law a bill that, among other things, targets the use of so-called non-disclosure provisions in employment

About 1.4 million Americans recognize themselves – surgically or otherwise – as a gender other than the one they were born into. In recent months, the Department of Justice (DOJ) has promoted the view that the federal employment anti-discrimination law, Title VII, does not ban employment discrimination against employees on the basis of gender identity.

Everyone knows that employers covered by the Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA) cannot intentionally refuse to hire job applicants because they are 40 years old or older, and that it is generally unlawful to post a job advertisement that says “people over the age of 40 need not apply.” Such practices constitute impermissible “disparate

On February 26, 2018, in a landmark decision continuing the expansion of Title VII’s protection, the Second Circuit Court of Appeals became the second federal appeals court to hold that Title VII prohibits discrimination on the basis of sexual orientation in the workplace. The decision in Zarda v. Altitude Express, Inc. aligns the Second Circuit