The Ninth Circuit recently ruled that salary history is no defense to a claim of sex discrimination under the federal Equal Pay Act, effectively expanding from the West Coast to the entire circuit a ban on a previously common hiring practice.

California, Oregon, Washington, and Hawaii have statutory bans on inquiring about job applicants’ salary

Pay equity continues to be a complex and evolving issue for employers. Although the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (“EEOC”) recently ended its Component 2 pay data collection, employers still face substantial challenges and developments relating to pay equity, including state law developments, public pressure, and litigation. This article briefly summarizes some of the recent developments.

On May 21 at 1:00 p.m. eastern, the Employment and Executive Compensation Groups of Hogan Lovells will host a one-hour webinar to discuss pay equity laws and compliance issues. A hot-button issue, pay equity is regularly in the news and atop legislative and regulatory agendas in the employment sphere at federal, state and local levels.

The issue of pay equity has risen to the top of the news cycle—especially today, a day dubbed Equal Pay Day by advocates seeking to raise public awareness.  But pay equity also is ascending legislative agendas and enforcement priorities, particularly at the state level.  Recognizing this trend, the Hogan Lovells U.S. Employment Group will host

On April 30, 2018, a Philadelphia federal judge issued an opinion striking down a portion of Philadelphia’s salary history ban. Salary history bans have become increasingly common tools used by various cities and states around the country attempting to combat wage disparities that exist across genders, races, and ethnicities.  The Philadelphia law consists of two