As employers are revising their return to work protocols in light of increased vaccination efforts and the prospect of increased on-site work, the federal government has been busy implementing additional COVID-19 safety measures for the workplace, including targeted on-site inspections of workplaces where workers may have been or are likely to be exposed to SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19).

Among other actions, on March 12, 2021, the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) issued a new National Emphasis Program (NEP), effective immediately, prioritizing inspections for “high-hazard industries or activities” where there is a hazard for contracting COVID-19 at the workplace. The NEP, published alongside an Updated Interim Enforcement Response Plan for Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) (ERP) is a result of President Biden’s inauguration day Executive Order in which he directed OSHA to focus its enforcement on COVID-19 efforts. President Biden’s executive order called for OSHA to consider implementing a potential nationwide Emergency Temporary Standard (ETS). The NEP and ERP suggest that an ETS may be issued in the future by stating that if an ETS is issued, its requirements will take precedence over OSHA’s currently-available standards.

The stated goal of the NEP is to “significantly reduce or eliminate worker exposures to SARS-CoV-2 by targeting industries and worksites where employees may have a high frequency of close contact exposures and therefore, controlling the health hazards associated with such exposures. This goal will be accomplished by a combination of inspection targeting, outreach to employers, and compliance assistance…”
Continue Reading OSHA issues National Emphasis Program and Enforcement Response Plan, targeting certain industries for inspections

The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has issued revised guidance in the form of three new Q&As on its website further clarifying when employers must inform OSHA if employees are hospitalized or die due to COVID-19.

By way of background, any on-the-job illness or injury that leads to hospitalization must be reported by

The Labor and Employment Group at Hogan Lovells is proud to have contributed to the 2020 version of the firm’s Doing Business in the United States Guide. The Guide provides a high-level overview of the laws and practices important to foreign investors interested in operating in the United States, including recent legal developments.  The

New York employers – New York State has gifted you an early holiday present – a requirement to update your handbook, comply with a new law immediately or potentially face steep consequences.

On November 8, 2019, Governor Cuomo signed into law a bill prohibiting employment discrimination based on an employee’s or a dependent’s “reproductive health

Beginning on July 1, 2019, Virginia employers must, for the first time, disclose certain employment records of current and former employees upon request. See Va. Code § 8.01-413.1. This blog post answers some essential questions about the new law.

What does the law require an employer to disclose? The law states that upon request

Internal Labor Regulations

  • Do you have an Employee Handbook?
  • Do you want to reinforce your policies?
  • Are you going to apply disciplinary actions?

The Internal Labor Regulations (ILR) is a set of mandatory rules for employees and employers for the development of work. Any policy applicable to employees should be included in the ILR to