For many workers throughout the US, the New Year has begun with increased hourly wages.  On January 1, 2018, 18 states and 22 cities/counties across the nation increased their minimum wage.  Ten of these states raised their minimum wage through legislation, while the remaining states will see an increase because of cost-of-living adjustments to existing minimum wage laws.  According to various think tanks, the minimum wage increase is likely to affect roughly 3.9 to 4.5 million workers nationwide.

 

Alaska: $9.84 an hour (.41% increase by inflation adjustment; $.04 increase)

Albuquerque, New Mexico: $8.95 an hour

Arizona: $10.50 an hour (5.0% increase by legislation; $.50 increase)

Bernalillo County, New Mexico: $8.85 an hour

California: $11 an hour for businesses with 26 or more employees (4.8% increase by legislation; $.50 increase); $10.50 an hour for businesses with 25 or fewer employees

Colorado: $10.20 an hour (9.7% increase by legislation; $.90 increase)

Cupertino, California: $13.50 an hour

El Cerrito, California: $13.60 an hour

Flagstaff, Arizona: $11 an hour

Florida: $8.25 an hour (1.9% increase by inflation adjustment; $.15 increase)

Hawaii: $10.10 an hour (9.2% increase by legislation; $.85 increase)

Los Altos, California: $13.50 an hour

Maine: $10 an hour (11.1% increase by legislation; $1 increase)

Michigan: $9.25 an hour (3.9% increase by legislation; $.35% increase)

Milpitas, California: $12 an hour

Minneapolis, Minnesota: $10 an hour for businesses with more than 100 employees

Minnesota: $9.65 an hour for businesses with annual gross revenue of $500,000 or more (1.6% increase by inflation adjustment; $.15 increase); $7.87 an hour for businesses with annual gross revenue of less than $500,000

Missouri: $7.85 an hour (2.0% increase by inflation adjustment; $.15 increase)

Montana: $8.30 an hour (1.8% increase by inflation adjustment; $.15 increase)

Mountain View, California: $15 an hour

New Jersey: $8.60 an hour (1.9% increase by inflation adjustment; $.70 increase)

New York City, New York: $13 an hour for standard New York City businesses with greater than 10 employees; $12 an hour for standard New York City businesses with 10 or fewer employees; $13.50 for fast food workers

Long Island, New York: $11 an hour for standard workers

Westchester, New York: $11 an hour for standard workers

New York: $10.40 for standard workers (7.2% increase through legislation; $.70 increase); $11.75 for fast food workers

Oakland, California: $13.23 an hour

Ohio: $8.30 an hour (1.8% increase by inflation adjustment; $.15 increase)

Palo Alto, California: $13.50 an hour

Rhode Island: $10.10 an hour (5.2% increase by legislation; $.50 increase)

Richmond, California: $13.41 an hour

San Jose, California: $13.50 an hour

San Mateo, California: $13.50 an hour for standard businesses; $12 an hour for nonprofits

Santa Clara, California: $13 an hour

SeaTac, Washington: $15.64 an hour for hospitality and transportation employees

Seattle, Washington: $15.45 an hour for businesses with 501 or more employees that don’t offer medical benefits ($15 an hour for those that do offer medical benefits); $14 an hour for businesses with 500 or fewer employees that don’t offer medical benefits ($11.50 an hour for those that do offer medical benefits)

South Dakota: $8.85 an hour (2.3% increase by legislation; $.20 increase)

Sunnyvale, California: $15 an hour

Tacoma, Washington: $12 an hour

Vermont: $10.50 an hour (5% increase by legislation; $.50 increase)

Washington: $11.50 an hour (4.6% increase by legislation; $.50 increase)

 

More increases are set to take effect later in the year, as Oregon and Maryland will raise their respective minimum wages in July.  And on July 1, 2018, Chicago will raise its minimum wage to $12 an hour and Los Angeles will raise its minimum wage to $13.25 an hour for employers with 26 or more employees and $12 an hour for employers with less than 26 employees.